Virtual Friday – 8

It’s the 8th of May and 75 years since VE (Victory in Europe) Day. There were to be many public gatherings and events which due to Coronavirus have had to be cancelled. Nevertheless, people are remembering the anniversary in inventive ways ranging from community lunches where neighbours gather together but separately to have lunch – each in their own garden, to inspired knitting projects such as Linda’s VE (Virus Eradication) Day virus.

It’s hard to believe that we’re already having our 8th virtual meeting. We’re so used to not going out that it might be hard to start socialising again, but I’m sure we’ll get back into the swing of things quickly once we’re ‘released’.

Our Zoom meetings are becoming more polished and are even better than some of the ‘at home’ interviews we see on TV. There were 13 of us today, two joining by phone. We’ve been busy sewing masks and knitting of course. Alison has knitted hearts for Covid19 patients at Stepping Hill Hospital:

The idea of the hearts is that they are a pair; one is placed in the hand of the severely ill patient and the other is with the patient’s loved one/s. If you can’t be together then at least you can hold something symbolic in your hands to act as a link. Such a lovely idea.

The theme for this week’s quiz was, appropriately, knitting in the 1940’s. I had great fun sourcing the questions and came across a lot of interesting information. If you are interested in knitting something from the period, or just looking at the patterns, there are some free to download on the Victoria & Albert Museum website.

Here are the quiz questions and answers:

6 thoughts on “Virtual Friday – 8

    1. Indeed! They had to stick to the officially approved patterns so couldn’t personalise the things made. However it was permitted to add little notes in with knitted items. This resulted in many a correspondence between knitter and recipient. Not all of them had happy endings.

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  1. How interesting! Is there any collection of the written notes – that would be fascinating social history!

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    1. Yes there is. Someone has written a dissertation on this – can’t recall where/who etc as I’ve looked at quite a few sources recently when researching questions.

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